A Week in Review is a weekly summary of the best digital stories from around the web. Is there a story worth reading that we missed? Discuss our picks and share your favorite stories from the week in our comments section below.

What it’s really like to be black and work in fashion via The Cut
It all makes sense once you see that behind the scenes, on sets for magazine covers, in castings for runways, and on the teams chosen to create multimillion-dollar ad campaigns, black people are rarely to be found in positions of power. There have never been more than one or two black editors-in-chief of any major U.S. magazines, and only one black designer leading a major American fashion brand.

At the U.S. Open, It’s What You Wear via The New York Times
Blame it on the tournament’s proximity to New York Fashion Week, which starts the week after the Open begins; the energy of the bright lights, big city vibe; or the sheer fact that this is, after all, one of the few tournaments that involves “evening dress” (outfits for night matches, which are often different from day matches because of the colors and cocktail hour involved) — but over the last 40 years the U.S. Open has been something of a petri dish for tennis fashion for both men and women.

19 Questions with Jorja Smith via SSENSE
I get obsessed with things. I get obsessed with ideas, then I correct myself and start being rational. I’m also not very good with affection. If someone is upset, I don’t know what to do with them. Instead of giving them a hug, I’ll touch them with one finger.

In His Posthumous Memoir, Bill Cunningham Recalls His Bohemian Beginnings via Vogue
On Sundays I would roam the streets of New York after early church, feasting my eyes on the wonderful window displays, which are perhaps the best free show in New York, always winding up my tour at the public library on Fifth Avenue. There I would spend the evening looking through old issues of Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, and the library’s superb collection of costume books.

An Alternative to Bollywood Style via The New York Times
Growing up in West Delhi, I often felt restricted. There was just too much bling and an excess of embroidery on everything. My mother always taught me the values of Sanskar balance, of being secure in yourself, and I feel that has had a big influence on me and the clothes I create.